Aydin Aysu

Assistant Professor
 919-515-7907
  aaysu@ncsu.edu
 Engineering Building II (EB2) 3076
 Campus Box 7911
  Website
 @aaysu_NCSU

Biography

Dr. Aysu received his B.S degree in microelectronics engineering with a mathematics minor and his M.S degree in electrical engineering from Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey. He received his Ph.D. degree in computer engineering from Virginia Tech and was a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Texas at Austin before he joined NC State. Dr. Aysu conducts research on cybersecurity with an emphasis on hardware-based security. The focus of his research is the development of secure systems that prevent advanced cyber attacks targeting hardware vulnerabilities. To that end, his research interests cover applied cryptography, computer architecture, and digital hardware design. He also works on cybersecurity education and the societal impacts of cybersecurity.

Education

  • Ph.D. 2016
    Computer Engineering
    Virginia Tech
  • Master's 2010
    Electrical Engineering
    Sabanci University, Turkey
  • Bachelor's 2008
    Microelectronics Engineering
    Sabanci University, Turkey

Research Focus

  • Computer Architecture and Systems

Highlighted Awards

Awards & Honors

  • 2020 - Best Paper Award, Design, Automation and Test in Europe Conference
  • 2019 - Faculty Research and Professional Development Award (FRPD), NC State
  • 2019- NSF Research Initiation Initiative (CRII) Award
  • 2019- Best Paper Award, ACM Great Lake Symposium on VLSI, Microelectronic Systems Education
  • 2019- Best Student Paper Nominee, IEEE International Conference on Hardware Security and Trust
  • 2018- Best Paper Nominee, IEEE International Conference on Hardware Security and Trust
  • 2017- Top 50 Article, IEEE Embedded System Letters

Recent News

New Approach From ECE Researchers Allows for Faster Ransomware Detection

Posted on May 19, 2022 | Filed Under: Research

NC State Electrical and Computer Engineering researchers have developed a new approach for implementing ransomware detection techniques, allowing them to detect a broad range of ransomware far more quickly than previous systems.

Aydin Aysu and Tianfu Wu Named Goodnight Early Career Innovators

Posted on April 26, 2022 | Filed Under: Awards

Congratulations to our two faculty members, Aydin Aysu and Tianfu Wu, for being recognized as a Goodnight Early Career Innovator!

NC State Faculty Members Awarded Funded Research for Secure Virtualization

Posted on September 20, 2021 | Filed Under: Research

The Office of Naval Research has granted Amro Awad and Aydin Aysu—both assistant professors of electrical and computer engineering at NC State—research funding to discover more secure virtualization techniques in hardware accelerators. 

Recent Media Mentions

Researchers Demonstrate They Can Steal Data During Homomorphic Encryption

June 13, 2022

Homomorphic encryption allows third parties and third-party technologies to conduct operations on encrypted data. Homomorphic encryption is appealing because it preserves data privacy but allows users to make use of the data. It is considered a next-generation data security technology, but researchers have identified a vulnerability that could allow threat actors to steal data even as it is being encrypted.

A group of academics from the North Carolina State University and Dokuz Eylul University have demonstrated “the first side-channel attack on homomorphic encryption” that could be exploited to leak data as the encryption process is underway.

Researchers Demonstrate New Side-Channel Attack on Homomorphic Encryption

March 3, 2022

A group of academics from the North Carolina State University and Dokuz Eylul University have demonstrated what they say is the “first side-channel attack” on homomorphic encryption that could be exploited to leak data as the encryption process is underway. “Basically, by monitoring power consumption in a device that is encoding data for homomorphic encryption, we are able to read the data as it is being encrypted,” Aydin Aysu, one of the authors of the study, said. “This demonstrates that even next generation encryption technologies need protection against side-channel attacks.”

NC State researchers find security vulnerabilities with some older iPhones

September 14, 2021

It was a very like a shot in the dark,” said Aydin Aysu, who is an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at N.C. State.

 

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